Job Opportunity: Research Assistant – Bertha Centre African Investing for Impact Barometer

The African Investing for Impact (AIFI) Barometer is an annual publication produced by the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. It strives to objectively depict the spectrum of investments in Africa which seek to combine financial returns and positive impact on society and the environment.

Position Summary

This role is an opportunity for a talented graduate student interested to join the Bertha Centre team on ad-hoc basis. The candidate must be professional, able to work independently and driven. It essential to have excellent research, writing and organisational skills. The successful applicant should have previous knowledge of the investment management industry. Previous knowledge of responsible investment and impact investment would also be an advantage. The successful applicant would be required to spend up to 20 hours a week and a stipend will be disbursed based on the number of days and level of effort.

Main Duties and Responsibilities

The research assistant is required to support the lead researcher (Mr. Xolisa Dhlamini) and the head of publication, (Associate Professor Stephanie Giamporcaro) in the following ways:

  • Assisting with research on investing for impact in Africa;
  • Assisting with identifying fund managers, contacting them and organising the data collected;
  • Assisting with analysing the data collected and drafting research findings;

Requirements

  • Own computer
  • Proficient with use of MS suite, particularly Excel
  • Attention to detail in data gathering, analysis and reporting
  • Understanding of investment/fund management principles
  • Ability to gather and analyse large amounts of data
  • A team player who can work independently

How to Apply

Please send a brief CV and one-page cover letter explaining why you meet the criteria to: Mr. Xolisa Dhlamini (dhlxol001@gsb.uct.ac.za) stating “Barometer Research Assistant” in the subject line. Applications will close on the 21st of April, 2017.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Request for Proposals: Girls Outcomes Fund

1.     Organisational background

 The Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship (BC) is the first academic centre in Africa dedicated to advancing social innovation and entrepreneurship. It was established as a specialised unit at the UCT Graduate School of Business in late 2011, in partnership with the Bertha Foundation, a family foundation that works with inspiring leaders who are catalysts for social and economic change. Today the Centre is a dynamic space, with several programme areas in Advancing Social Innovation, Education Innovation, Inclusive Health Innovation, Innovative Finance and ScaleShift, with a strong focus on South Africa and Africa.

The core approach of the Bertha Centre has been to uncover, pioneer and connect social innovations and social entrepreneurs that work to generate inclusive opportunities and advance social justice in our country and continent. Since inception, our team has uncovered over 300 innovative models, programmes and solutions; convened over 5,000 citizens and practitioners across sectors; tested the feasibility of pioneering social solutions ranging from social impact bonds, social franchising, and social innovation hubs; and produced numerous knowledge outputs and publications and awarded over R4m in Bertha Scholarships to over 40 African students. Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship is now one of the school’s three strategic themes in its 5-year strategy.

In the last three years, our team has played a leading role in integrating outcomes-based principles into public and private sector contracts and financial instruments. We have worked with national, provincial and local governments to determine the potential for setting up Impact Bonds or other Payment by Results instruments for Early Childhood Development, workforce development, job creation, tertiary student support and HIV prevention.

2.     Purpose and objectives

  • Design and implementation of Outcomes Fund
  • Increase educational and economic activity in young girls and women in order to reduce their risk of contracting HIV

The BC has been working with Johnson & Johnson (J&J) for the last 6 months to identify an innovative finance project that the Global Public Health (GPH) team can pilot and potentially scale. The innovative finance instrument is not an end in itself but rather a tool that GPH can use to further the work being done in three key areas being the prevention of HIV in adolescent girls, drug resistant TB and maternal and child deaths in low income communities.

The purpose of this project will be to create an Outcomes Fund that will help to promote educational and economic activity in adolescent girls and young women in Gauteng and/or Kwazulu Natal thereby reducing the risk of their contracting HIV.

The output- or outcomes-based contracting and financing model is purported to drive innovation and efficiency of delivery through incentive effects. A funder and service provider agree on results and payment is based on achievement of those results. There is thus a financial incentive for delivery, which in turn incentivises ongoing data collection and programmatic improvements.

Operating from the assumption that young girls are increasingly entering romantic relationships or transactional sex work in search of financial security, GPH is aiming to incentivise them to stay in school and attain either further formal training or employment. This will increase their ability to provide for themselves financially which will decrease the prevalence of risky behaviour thereby lowering HIV infection rates.

3.     Activities 

  1. Perform scoping study to identify target focus of fund: To assess the high-level potential for an innovative finance instrument, including considerations such as the scope for a clearly defined issue, target beneficiary group, demand from stakeholders, intervention model and payment trigger metrics.
  2. Perform feasibility study; build business case and design fund in particular focus area: To design an Outcomes Fund that will finance a range of innovative finance instruments, including their overall structure, detailed operational and financial models and proposition for key stakeholders.
  3. Implement fund design by identifying and supporting implementing organisations: To develop a pilot/s and build systems to support J&J in the management of the fund as well as collect data that will inform the next objective.
  4. Refine and develop fund design: To adjust the design depending on what is working and attract additional funders in order to initiate second round of outcomes payments from the fund.

4.     Scope

There are three phases to this project the first of which is covered by these Terms of Reference. The Project Partner will have the opportunity to bid for Phase 2 and 3 of this project towards the end of the first phase.

The process of designing and implementing an Outcomes Fund is non linear and iterative. The activities contained in this scope are thus guidelines based on previous experience but the Project Partner will be required to be flexible, if research suggests an alternative approach.

The Project Partner role can be performed by a single organisation or split between organisations depending on their expertise. It can also be taken on by a single organisation that subcontracts experts to carry out certain tasks.

The writing up of legal contracts will be done by J&J thus falling outside of the scope of this bid. The legal team will however need to be briefed on the parameters of those contracts by the Project Partner.

Phase 1: <R850, 000

This phase will involve scoping, feasibility, fund design and implementation of first round of fund disbursement.

1 Scoping study
Define social issue
Identify target beneficiaries
Select outcome metrics
Analyse possible intervention models
Map outcome funder landscape
Map investor funder landscape
Engage stakeholders
2 Feasibility and design

Develop Outcome Fund structure options

Design contracting methodology

Establish pricing methodology

Build payment mechanism and financial model

Build M&E framework

Design technical assistance framework
Engage stakeholders
3 Implementation and capacity building

Design and run procurement process

Support implementers to prepare bid and raise investment

Develop performance management system

Engage stakeholders

Disseminate learnings

Phase 2: TBD

This phase will involve some pre-contracting and all ongoing support required by the implementer in order to deliver on outcomes –based contract.

4 Performance management
Structure investment
Strengthen M&E systems
Provide performance management support

 Phase 3: TBD

This phase will involve refining the initial fund design, raising additional funding and running a second procurement round.

5 Refine and develop
Refine fund design
Conduct second procurement process
Support implementers to prepare bid and raise investment
Disseminate learnings
6 Implementation and capacity building
Design and run procurement process
Due diligence
Support implementers to prepare bid and raise investment
Develop performance management system
Engage stakeholders
Disseminate learnings

5.     Accountabilities and Responsibilities

The BC has completed the design of several outcome-based contracting projects and would like to support the Project Partner in building this expertise. We will thus work alongside the winning bidder in an advisory, symbiotic and oversight capacity in order to achieve the objectives below.

The responsibilities of each party will be formalised during the planning phase. In summary we will co-design the fund but the Project Partner will do the bulk of the research, interviews and report writing.

Shortlisted bidders will be given the opportunity to discuss and refine bids during an hour-long interview. The collaboration will officially kick off with a workshop where project plans and milestones will be agreed. The ongoing communication will likely be in the form of weekly meetings with an increase in frequency at the start of each particular phase as well as workshops, site visits and stakeholder meetings.

The BC will assign a Project Manager to represent the centre during the project. The Project Manager will be responsible for:

  • Overall responsibility and accountability for the project.
  • Guidance throughout all phases of execution.
  • Approval of all deliverables.

The Project Partner is responsible for:

  • Conducting the scoping, feasibility, design and implementation of the Outcomes Fund;
  • Day–to–day management of operations;
  • Regular progress reporting to BC’s Project Manager;
  • Production of deliverables in accordance with contractual requirements.

6.     Deliverables & Timings

This engagement is intended to run over a 10 month time period from April 2017 to 30 January 2018.

A draft work plan will be drawn up in conjunction with BC in the week before the contract is signed.

Phase 1

  1. Scoping study

7 April 2017 to 1 June 2017

Output: Scoping study document and presentation assessing high level potential for Outcomes Fund including consideration of social issue, target beneficiaries and outcome metrics, with a view to informing discussions with potential outcomes funders, such as government and donor agencies, and feasibility of the fund in the second phase

  1. Feasibility and design

1 June 2017 to 1 September 2017

Output: Feasibility study document and revised presentation with outline of the design of the outcomes fund, including the overall structure, detailed operational and financial model and proposition for key stakeholders. Includes list of possible operational and funding partners

  1. Implementation and capacity building

1 October 2017 to 1 January 2018

Output: Fund design document and implementation plan with stakeholder buy-in. Contract/s signed with implementers/s. Performance management plan. Learning document on start of implementation phase.

These deliverables are to be:

  • Submitted electronically via e-mail and/or on a flash-drive.
  • Submitted in hard copy format (2). All reports are to be submitted to Project Manager

Phase 2 

  1. Performance management

1 January 2018 for 1-3 years

Phase 3

  1. Refine and develop

1 January 2018 to 1 April 2018

  1. Implementation and capacity building

1 April 2018 to 30 September 2018

Output: Fund design document and stakeholder buy in. Implementation plan for second procurement round. Additional outcomes funders engaged and recruited. Learning document to be generated after fund has been refined.

7.     Project Partner qualifications

The Project Partner is expected to be:

  • A reliable and effective consultant with extensive experience in developing and implementing multi-stakeholder projects
  • Proven track record in conducting similar projects
  • Understanding and knowledge of the target areas

8.     Application Procedure

Interested Project Partners should respond with proposals including technical and financial items.

The technical items should include:

  • Organisational profile and details
  • Details of previous experience developing and implementing projects, highlighting relevant topic or context (social investment, NGO, social enterprise, outcomes in young women and girls) and 1 or 2 sample reports;
  • Explanation of proposed approach and methodology drawing on activities outlined in the Scope;
  • CV(s) of proposed consultants/analysts that will be assigned to the project including nominated Project Leader.
  • MOU between partnering organisations if applicable

The financial items should include:

  • Breakdown of costs according to budget template supplied.
  • Explanation of cost assumptions
  • Costs to be supplied in ZAR
  • A fixed overall quotation up to a maximum of R850, 000

The proposals will be assessed based on previous experience, best value, i.e. best quality and cost-effectiveness of the proposed offers. Only quotations that include both technical and financial proposals will be considered.

Date and time Event
14h00 on 14 March 2017 Briefing
17h00 on 24 March 2017 Application submission
3 April 2017 Shortlist interview

There will be a 1 hour briefing session at the Solution Space and the Graduate School of Business, UCT on 14 March at 14h00. The Q&A from the briefing will be emailed to all interested bidders. If you cannot attend and have questions they can be emailed to BC in advance.

Shortlisted candidates will be contacted after the 24 March and asked to attend a 1 hour interview on 3 April during which time they will have the opportunity to discuss the proposal.

Quotations and questions should be submitted and directed to Dr Susan de Witt at susan.dewitt@gsb.uct.ac.za by or before 17h00 on 24 March 2017.

We look forward to receiving quotes from interested parties.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Job Opportunity: 2 Project Co-odinators for Innovative Finance Initiative: Innovative Finance Models

The Bertha Centre is looking for two project co-ordinators within our Innovative Finance Initiative. The Project Co-ordinator will work closely with the Bertha Centre’s partners, including policymakers, social investors, and social entrepreneurs, to implement the centre’s portfolio of activities around social entrepreneurship.

The Project Co-ordinator would contribute to the work on a number of projects alongside the rest of the Bertha Centre team, especially related to:

  • Landscaping and mapping of the social entrepreneurship sector in South Africa and select African countries
  • Content development for the implementation and expansion of the Pathways to Funding Do-ference
  • Managing and developing partnerships for the centre’s social entrepreneurship portfolio
  • Research & market intelligence – developing research to assist investors, policymakers and service providers to deploy capital in a way which generates both social and financial returns and further develops the social entrepreneurship sector
  • Supporting outcomes-based funding projects and innovative finance processes

Skills and experience

  • An appropriate graduate qualification (Bachelor’s Degree) in finance, economics and other related fields with a minimum of 3 years’ experience as a project coordinator or similar role or a Master’s Degree with 1-year experience as a project coordinator or similar role
  • Practical experience in coordinating and implementing projects in social entrepreneurship in South Africa or a Southern African country will serve as an added advantage
  • Some experience working with actors across sectors (including private, public, and civil society)
  • Demonstrable passion for social innovation and social entrepreneurship
  • Aptitude for project planning
  • Research skills and the ability to quickly research, synthesise and summarise key lessons on unfamiliar topics
  • Good communication skills and ability to collaborate with numerous stakeholders
  • Strong experience coordinating large entrepreneurship events in multiple locations across
  • South Africa, i.e. logistics, content curation, speaker coordination, local research, etc.
  • Experience writing proposals and reports for funders and partners
  • Experience curating knowledge products focused social entrepreneurship, i.e. podcasts, blog posts, articles, teaching, etc.

Contract would be for a two-year term and the annual remuneration package which is inclusive of benefits, will fall between R311 853 to R366 848 depending experience.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

For more information about The Graduate School of Business please visit www.gsb.uct.ac.za.

To apply, please visit http://www.gsb.uct.ac.za/workforus , click the big blue box “View all jobs”, follow the brief registration process at the bottom of the advert and submit the following documents:

  • UCT Application Form (download at http://web.uct.ac.za/depts/sapweb/forms/hr201.doc)
  • Cover letter motivating your application
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)

Should you not receive a response within two weeks after the closing date, consider your application as being unsuccessful.

An application which does not comply with the above requirements will be regarded as incomplete.

Reference number: E70224
Contact details: Sue de Witt and Tine Fisker – 021 406 1091
Closing date: 03 March 2017

UCT is committed to the pursuit of excellence, diversity and redress in achieving its equity targets. Our Employment Equity Policy is available at http://www.uct.ac.za/downloads/uct.ac.za/about/policies/eepolicy.pdf.

Posted in Innovative Finance, Vacancy | Leave a comment

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF MONITORING & EVALUATION FRAMEWORK – 24 FEBRUARY 2017

1. Background

The Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship is the first academic centre in Africa dedicated to advancing social innovation and entrepreneurship. It was established as a specialised unit at the UCT Graduate School of Business in late 2011, in partnership with the Bertha Foundation, a family foundation that works with inspiring leaders who are catalysts for social and economic change. Today the Centre is a dynamic space, with several programme areas in Advancing Social Innovation, Education Innovation, Inclusive Health Innovation, Innovative Finance and ScaleShift, with a strong focus on South Africa and Africa.

The core approach of the Bertha Centre has been to uncover, pioneer and connect social
innovations and social entrepreneurs that work to generate inclusive opportunities and advance social justice in our country and continent. Since inception, our team has uncovered over 300 innovative models, programmes and solutions; convened over 5,000 citizens and practitioners across sectors; tested the feasibility of pioneering social solutions ranging from social impact bonds, social franchising, and social innovation hubs; and produced numerous knowledge outputs and publications and awarded over R4m in Bertha Scholarships to over 40 African students. Furthermore, the Raymond Ackerman Academy for Entrepreneurial Development and the MTN Solution Space are additional programmes related to the Bertha Centre.

In five years, our team has played a leading role in integrating social innovation into the university, making it the first business school in the world to put social impact and innovation at the heart of its work. Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship is now one of the school’s three strategic themes in its 5-year strategy. In 2015, the Bertha Centre was awarded the Distinguished Award for Social Responsiveness at the University of Cape Town. In 2016, the school hosted the first MBA in the world to have Social Innovation in its core curriculum and opened its satellite campus in Philippi
Village.

2. Purpose, Objectives & Scope of Work

Over the past five years, the Bertha Centre has grown in the scope and reach of its work. It is now at a critical time moving into its next five-year strategy and an exciting phase in its development. The next five-year strategy builds on the vision and mission established as the original intent of the Bertha Centre, and speaks to the types of opportunities that they will seek to engage in going forward. The Bertha Centre recently undertook an evaluation of the first five years of its work. It is also in the midst of developing a Strategic Plan for 2017-2018. Guided by this Evaluation Report and our new Strategic Plan’s mission and strategic objectives, the Bertha Centre is now in need of a Service Provider to:

1. Develop a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework for measuring the centre’s performance in line with its strategic plan; the framework should encompass the following key elements:

a. Programme goals definitions;
b. Programme indicators;
c. Baseline and targets;
d. Data flow processes;
e. Data sources and data collection points;
f. Data collection tools;

2. Identify the most appropriate metrics for measuring the impact of the Bertha Centre’s
programmes into the next 5 years. The metrics should be targeted to measuring the outputs, outcomes and impact.

3. Develop the Terms of Reference (ToRs) for the design of the M&E system based on the
framework.

4. Develop the job description for the Bertha Centre internal resource that will be responsible for managing the M&E function internally.

3. Stakeholder involvement

Stakeholder participation is fundamental to this brief. The Service Provider is expected to conduct a participatory workshop providing for active and meaningful involvement by investment partners, beneficiaries, Bertha Centre, RAA staff and other interested parties. Stakeholder participation is to be an integral component of the M&E design and planning; information collection; the development of recommendations; and the framework.

4. Accountabilities and Responsibilities

The Bertha Centre will assign a Project Manager to represent it during the project. Together with the Bertha Centre’s COO, the Project Manager will be responsible for:

  • Overall responsibility and accountability for the project;
  • Guidance throughout all phases of execution;
  • Approval of deliverables;
  • Act as the Centre’s key and primary contact person.

The Service Provider will report to Bertha’s Project Manager.

5. Deliverables

This engagement is intended to run over a three months’ time period from 1 March 2017-31 May 2017, with the following deliverables:

1. Monitoring and evaluation framework as outlined in section 2 of this SoW;
2. Performance and impact measuring metrics;
3. ToRs for the design of the M&E computerised system;
4. Job description for the M&E internal resource.

In addition to the above, submissions should be:

  • Prepared in English only.
  • Submitted electronically via e-mail and/or on a thumb-drive.
  • Submitted to the named contact person only.

6. Timings

This project is expected to be completed within three months after the signing of the contract with the following deliverable timelines.

6.1 Draft Workplan
A draft workplan will be submitted within one (1) week of the signing of the contract.

6.2 Final Workplan
Within one (1) week of receiving Bertha Centre’s comments on the draft workplan, the Service Provider will be required to produce a final workplan for approval by the Bertha Centre.

6.3 First Draft Submission of the key deliverables
The Service Provider will be required to submit the draft M&E Framework, draft TORs for the development of the M&E computerised system and draft job description for the internal M&E resource for review by Bertha Centre within six (6) weeks of the approval of the workplan.

6.4 Final Submission
The Service Provider will be required to submit the final deliverables (M&E Framework,
Performance Measuring Metrics, Draft TOR’s for a computerized M&E System and Job Description for Bertha Centre’s internal resource) within four (4) weeks of the receipt of Bertha Centre’s comments on the submitted draft.

8. Application Procedure

Interested consultants should respond with proposals including technical and financial items.

The technical items should include:

  • Proposed methodology and workplan
  • Details of previous experience in developing programme monitoring and evaluation
    frameworks, highlighting relevant topic or context (social innovation & entrepreneurship,
    university centres) and 3 sample frameworks;
  • CV(s) of proposed consultants that will be assigned to the consultancy mandate, including
    nominated Project Leader.

The financial items should include:

  • Fixed overall quotation in a single currency with the following structure:
  • Breakdown of fees per deliverable as per section 6 above
  • Other costs
  • TOTAL amount in South African Rands (ZAR)

Further documentation, including recent evaluation report, draft strategic plan 2017-2018, existing programme metrics, is available to credible consultants interested in submitting a proposal, and will be forwarded upon request of such documentation.
The proposals will be assessed based on previous experience, best value, i.e. best quality and cost-effectiveness of the proposed offers, and BBBEE considerations. Only quotations that include both technical and financial proposals will be considered.

Proposals must be submitted using the Annexure A (Proposal Template) and must be submitted to Miss Katusha de Villiers katusha.devilliers@gsb.uct.ac.za by 24 February 2017.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Job Opportunity: Project Managers (x2) – Innovative Business Models: Application Deadline – 14 February 2017

The Bertha Centre is looking for two Project Managers within the Bertha Centre’s work in Innovative Finance.  The candidate will be working with the Innovative Finance team on several projects which include:

  • Designing & piloting innovative finance products for green SMEs in partnership with the World Bank and Green Cape
  • Drafting a Social Investment Policy Paper for the South African Government and putting together a NationalAdvisory Board to   join the Global Steering Impact Investment Steering Group
  • Working with the South African government to redesign student financing
  • Creating an Outcomes-Based commissioning course for African policy makers and others.

Roles and Responsibilities:

  • Work with funders, government, corporates, social enterprises and development organizations to develop new Innovative Financing mechanisms throughout Africa
  • Engage governments on the design of Impact Bonds / outcome based procurement / Impact Investing
  • Researching international developments in Innovative Finance
  • Provide practical support to the ongoing projects and team
  • Support the development of Innovative Business Models curriculum to support organisations, UCT students and private business
  • Facilitate workshops with stakeholders to solicit feedback, collect data and create training opportunities
  • Engage with local and international initiative partners
  • Participate across initiative activities and support where needed
  • Publishing op-eds, research articles, blog posts and other contributions to national and local news outlets
  • Undertake speaking engagements and conference attendance
  • Writing grant proposals for future projects
  • Manage analysts and interns

Ideal candidate (educational and experience requirements):

  • An appropriate post graduate qualification (MBA, CFA, CA, MPP or other relevant qualification)
  • Practical experience in implementing and managing projects
  • 5 years of work experience, with a minimum of 3 years in impact investing
  • Experience working with stakeholders across sectors (including private, public, and civil society)
  • A background in management consulting or finance with policy exposure and innovative financing and design thinking a plus

Skill Requirements:

  • Highly organized, and effective in delivering on set objectives across multiple projects and initiatives
  • Ability to manage budgets and use funding efficiently
  • Ability to work under tight deadlines and deliver high quality work
  • Ability to manage multiple, often complex and/or competing priorities
  • Ability to communicate professionally, and manage relationships with high-level partners
  • Proficient writing skills, especially publications, policy papers and report writing
  • Advanced computer skills (including Excel)
  • Knowledge of Innovative Financing or Design Thinking a plus

Characteristics:

  • Passionate about supporting innovation in the Social Finance market
  • A creative team player, involved in and committed to the Bertha Centre’s mission, priorities, and team
  • Alignment with the Bertha Centre’s core values, namely our commitment to being People & Community focused; Courageous & Entrepreneurial; Collaborative & Inclusive; and Considerate & Humble
  • Willing to support Bertha Centre team members in multiple ways, sometimes beyond job description

Contract would be for a three year term and the annual remuneration package for 2016, including benefits, will fall between R394 026 and R463 559 depending upon experience.

To apply, please visit http://www.gsb.uct.ac.za/workforus, click on blue box “View all jobs”, follow the brief registration process at the bottom of the advert and submit the following documents:

An application which does not comply with the above requirements will be regarded as incomplete. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted and may be required to undergo an assessment.

Telephone:                  +27 21 650 5689           Website:                      www.gsb.uct.ac.za.

Reference number:      E17003                          Closing date:               14 February 2016

UCT is committed to the pursuit of excellence, diversity and redress in achieving its equity targets. Our Employment Equity Policy is available at http://www.hr.uct.ac.za/hr/policies/employ_equity .

UCT reserves the right not to appoint.

Posted in Innovative Finance, Vacancy | Leave a comment

Strategy Consultant Position: Rockefeller Foundation Global Fellowship Program on Social Innovation—design interval

The Bertha Centre is looking for a strategy consultant for the design interval of the Rockefeller Foundation Global Fellowship Program on Social Innovation to assist with programme review, landscaping, and aligning partnerships (especially, Rockefeller Foundation priorities) from a strategic perspective. This position is a 6-month contract Bertha Centre post.

Main Duties and Responsibilities

The Strategic Consultant is expected to landscape the global context of systems, work and develop a strategic framework in order to establish a new phase of the Rockefeller Foundation Global Fellowship Program on Social Innovation as a sustained, shared, proven model that demonstrates success and impact. This includes the following:

  1. Reviewing the original purpose of the fellowship and developing deep perspectives on systems work with the knowledge, experience, and insights from running three cohorts.
  2. Conducting landscape review of systems thinking, and system entrepreneurship in social-ecological complex systems.
  3. Conducting research into the fellowship programme’s alignment with the Rockefeller Foundation strategy and programming priorities.
  4. Leading the medium-term strategy for the fellowship, in collaboration with the Bertha Centre.
  5. Contributing to the new programme design

The consultant will be expected to work both independently as well as part of the team at the Bertha Centre during the design interval. The consultant will also be expected to visit Rockefeller Foundation head office in New York City during the first phase. The position requires a 90% to full-time commitment from the incumbent for the initial ten weeks (Feb 20—April 30, 2017), with continuing team work for the remainder of the contract.

How to Apply

  • 1-2 page concept proposal outlining approach, drawing on experience with systems thinking and social innovation
  • High-level budget with estimated days and rates
  • Profile of individual(s) and/or organization involved
  • CV and sample of previous strategy report (shortlisted candidates invited for face to face meeting for discussion to elaborate further).

The successful applicant is expected to start as soon as possible and the contract is expected to end on the 31st August 2017.

Please email the above-mentioned documents to Ncedisa Nkonyeni ncedisa.nkonyeni@gsb.uct.ac.za.  Applications will close on the 14th of February 2017.

Work Breakdown Structure and   Schedule

 

# Activity Output/ Deliverable Start Date End Date
All (as detailed below)

Contribute to:

·Renewed vision

·Medium term strategy

·Proposal for phase 2

1. Reviewing the original purpose of the fellowship and developing deep perspectives on systems work with the knowledge, experience, and insights from running three cohorts. Summary of learning. Start date 28 Feb 2017
2. Conducting landscape review of systems thinking, and system entrepreneurship in social-ecological complex systems.

Report answering key questions:

· What are the emerging trends?

·What are the different system entrepreneur dialects/frames in use?

·Where do key case studies exist?

·Who are the possible (thought, field, logistics) partners and advisors? (Map and categorize.)

·What are the opportunities and gaps in the landscape?

Start date 30 April 2017
3. Conducting research into the fellowship programme’s alignment with the Rockefeller Foundation strategy and programming priorities. (Evaluation review, analysic of RF key documents, interviews with RF staff, alumni etc).

Report answering:

·What are the current perceived gaps and fit with RF evolving strategy?

·What are the key priorities and opportunities for better strategic fit?

·What are the constraints?

· What are 2—3 scenarios for going forward?

Start date 30 April 2017
4. Leading a medium- term strategy for the fellowship, in collaboration with the Bertha Centre Medium-term 3-5 year strategy Start date 30 April 2017
5. Contributing to the new programme design. Strategy contributions to the new programme design (taking the form of a proposal) 01 May 2017 31 Aug 2017

 

 

Posted in social innovation, Vacancy | Leave a comment

Lead Consultant Position: Rockefeller Foundation Global Fellowship Program on Social Innovation—design interval

The Bertha Centre is seeking a consultant to lead the design interval of the Rockefeller Foundation Global Fellowship Program on Social Innovation, coordinating a team and ensuring key deliverables are met on time and to the highest quality. This position is a 5-month contract Bertha Centre post.

Main Duties and Responsibilities

The Lead Consultant will be responsible for the project delivery and will work closely with the Bertha Centre’s Director and Project Manager in the delivery of the work plan, strategy documents, partnership agreements, and key reports. Specifically, to:

  1. Manage workflows, timelines, resources, monitoring, and decision-making processes.
  2. Manage and work with strategy consultant(s) on global landscape research.
  3. Manage communications; codification of existing resources/KM
  4. Conduct questionnaires and interviews.
  5. Compile and analyze learning.
  6. Manage and facilitate meetings with advisors, partners, key stakeholders, and faculty.
  7. Document discussions and decisions; write reports.

The consultant will be expected to work independently as well as part of the team at the Bertha Centre during the design interval. The consultant is projected to spend 90% consultant time through the entire period of engagement. The consultant may also be expected to do international travel.

How to Apply

  • 1 – 2 page concept proposal outlining a structured approach and experience in systems work in social innovation
  • High-level budget with estimated days and rates
  • Profile of individual(s) and/or organization involved
  • CV

The successful applicant is expected to start as soon as possible and the contract is expected to end on the 31st July 2017.

Please email the above-mentioned documents to Ncedisa Nkonyeni ncedisa.nkonyeni@gsb.uct.ac.za.  Applications will close on the 14th of February 2017.

Work Breakdown Structure and Schedule

# Activity Output / deliverable Start date End date
1 Manage workflows, timelines, resources, monitoring, and decision-making processes.

All deliverables

Detailed work plan

 

Start date July 31, 2017
2 Manage and work with strategy consultant(s) on global landscape research.

Renewed vision

Medium-term strategy

Start date July 31, 2017
3 Manage communications; codification of existing resources/KM Medium-term strategy Start date July 31, 2017
4 Conduct questionnaires and interviews.

Renewed vision

Medium-term strategy

Start date May 31, 2017
5 Compile and analyze learning

Renewed vision

Medium-term strategy

Start date July 31, 2017
6 Manage and facilitate meetings with advisors, partners, key stakeholders, and faculty.

Renewed vision

Medium-term strategy

Start date July 31, 2017
7 Document discussions and decisions. All deliverables Start date July 31, 2017

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Bertha Centre: Principles of Engagement

Introduction: Why we created these Principles

As the 2016 #FeesMustFall movement progressed across several South African universities, the Bertha Centre as a specialised unit operating within the UCT Graduate School of Business asked itself where and how we should be contributing to the discussions.

What became apparent after several internal discussions was that we needed, and desired, a set of Principles that would guide those who wanted to participate and support the movement in different ways and who had questions about how to engage from the outside.  We hope these principles will also be useful for those who prefer not to support the movement; and that they will act as a canvas against which to project their decision not to engage.  We developed these Principles as the basis for us to interact with one another in a non-judgmental way, and also for us to think about and engage with the challenges presented with humility, transparency and empathy – a humanity.

What we have ended up with, we believe, is a set of Principles we hope will guide us through #FeesMustFall, and transcend (to some degree) new challenges that will arise.

For now we have framed them specifically around the higher education challenges. However, this is a living document that encourages us as the Centre to make this a continuous process of reflection and deep engagement to understand the spaces we exist in and our role within them.

Principles of Engagement

Foreword

We appreciate all in our community  who continue to shine light on the unjust structures and experiences that remain embedded in our educational system.

We also appreciate all in our community who have been working to transform our educational system, and deliver quality education for our people.

We also start by recognising that the current movement  expresses a clear call for deep system change and thus offer a profound opportunity for social innovation.

The Principles

As a group of university members (faculty, administration and students) focused on social innovation and entrepreneurship, in order to meaningfully contribute towards social justice  and inclusive opportunities on the African continent – the Bertha Centre developed the following principles to help shape our own response to, and role in the current #FeesMustFall movement:

a) Engage with all stakeholders. A university is an expression of society as a whole. To move forward we need engagement not only from students, faculty, staff, and workers but also from business, government, civil society, and individual citizens. We welcome rely on, and encourage everyone’s proactive participation.

b) Cultivate empathy. Empathy takes practice and persistence. Understanding each other’s experiences is not only a moral good, it is also a prerequisite for innovation towards better solutions for all. We must dedicate ourselves to encounter diverse beliefs, roles, and life experiences. And commit to listening actively and to finding connections before advocating for our own points of view.

c) Make visible the moments and spaces of innovation within the movement. These are manifold. Many people are engaging with the movement by experimenting with deeper modes of dialogue, more democratic ways of making decisions and sharing power, considering more inclusive approaches to financing education, reviewing wider sets of information and research and asking more generative questions on the changing role of universities. These experiments should be shared and celebrated that they might become the norm and not the exception.

d) Commit to radical transparency. In times of stress and urgency, our first instinct might be to protect ourselves by putting up walls and decreasing transparency, but we must do the opposite if we hope to transform. We believe that transparency must be increased, possibly to the point of discomfort. It is particularly important to be transparent “upstream”. We must ask each other not simply to respond to proposals but to co-create them together.

e) Reject false contradictions and limited solutions. We are often presented with a fixed set of preordained choices and responses to conflict. “Increase fees or reduce the quality of education.”  “Continue with the school year as usual or lose a generation of professionals.”  “Employ private security or suffer violence.” While such propositions do highlight real-world tensions, they devalue imagination. There are never only two solutions. There is always a third, a fourth way, waiting to be discovered. And those alternatives are likely to prove more transformative in the long run.

f) Radical enquiry in scholarship. Pursue radical inquiry – radical meaning “root” – into the histories and structures that precede and hold up the present moment for a deeper understanding of the issues. This radical inquiry requires courage to reflect on ourselves and the positions we have within these histories.

g) Explore new pathways to peace. In alignment with the previous principle, we reject the idea that in order to have safety and security we must accept the use of force against our own community. We recognize that troubled times may bring a risk of violence, but we believe that risk is substantially increased by relying on police and private security. We challenge all to find the courage and creativity to engage with each other as a full and whole community. This may require different kinds of training and support. It may require the creation of new voluntary and/or professional roles. It may require relying on the assistance of outside experts in peace building. Whatever it takes, we must apply the necessary financial, social and personal resources needed to discover a peaceful way forward.

And in all things:

h) Practice humility. We know that we will do this work imperfectly. We know that we will fail more than we will succeed. We know that are traveling toward a future that we can only dimly imagine. So we challenge ourselves to remain open, to question our own beliefs, and to recognize the humanity and insight of even our harshest critics and opponents.

i) Bring it home. We commit to applying these principles as individuals. How can we best embody them, whatever role we might be playing in the movement or in the general life of the university. Social innovation requires sustained attention and experimentation from all of us.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A great start: A reflection on the Implicit Bias and Cultural Intelligence Workshops

Recent protests in tertiary institutions and schools across South Africa have called on all stakeholders invested in the learning journey of young people to reflect on the access to, and culture of, places of learning.

In light of this the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship partnered with Shikaya, a non-profit civil society organisation that recognises the crucial role that teachers and schools play in deepening and strengthening South Africa’s democracy, Durban High School and Facing History and Ourselves, an international nonprofit educational and professional development organization. The partnership hosted a series of ‘ReflectAction’ workshops in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Durban, and Cape Town at the end of October and beginning of November.

The workshops, invited principals, management teams and governing bodies to engage in honest reflection on the environments which have been created for young people in which to learn, with a focus on examining and highlighting the impact of implicit bias in our schools and how these biases can be overcome to develop a school environment embedded in the principles of cultural intelligence and emotional literacy.

Phase one of the workshops examined the concept of implicit bias and the forms in which it manifested itself in our personal lives and schools, as Dylan Wray the, CEO of Shikaya and workshop co-facilitator sharply put it:

“The first step is to understand that we all hold different biases, and that if you have a brain you are biased and at times prejudiced. A lot of our prejudices occur without us being aware of them.” Dylan Wray (workshop co-facilitator)

What those specific biases and prejudices are will differ across contexts but uncovering them is the foundation upon which a culturally intelligent and inclusive school and society can be built. It’s quite clear to anyone that looks at the protests past a superficial level that, both within tertiary and basic education, they are aren’t solely about fees or admissions documents. Beyond these issues, the protests are about challenging a culture and learning environment that makes many feel unwelcome. The policies that many schools draft are often the manifestation of implicit biases and prejudices which many are unaware they hold. Engaging in such challenging and often uncomfortable conversations with not only others but yourself, is a hard and often avoided action.

This is why it was so empowering and inspirational to have been able to witness groups of people who were willing to be challenged and critiqued in order to improve themselves and the lives of those they teach. As one participant astutely put it “I’m here to learn as much as I can and to be as uncomfortable as I can”.

The second phase of the workshop built on the concept of implicit bias, and introduced the practice of cultural intelligence, specifically the pathways to developing a culturally intelligent and open learning environment. Roy Hellenberg, the Vice-Principal of Durban Boys High School and workshop co-facilitator, opened up the afternoon by saying:

“You don’t become culturally intelligent because you’re sitting in a room with people who are different, simply opening your doors doesn’t make you culturally intelligent… you need to openly try and learn what you can do to accept different perspectives” Roy Hellenberg (Workshop co-facilitator)

Cultural intelligence is an ongoing process and workshops like this are only the beginning of what is to be a long journey on the road to culturally intelligent and open schools. Although participants didn’t leave with all answers, they left with a better understanding of where and how to start.

Equipping individuals with the skills to better themselves and understand their impact on the lives of learners is an invaluable and timely feat, and one which shouldn’t be taken for granted. It is encouraging to see the commitment to co-creating and nurturing culturally intelligent spaces for learners. Photos of the workshops can be viewed here.

Posted in Education Innovation, workshops | Leave a comment

Engaging With Research Workshop

Reflections on the Engaging With Research Workshop, by Megan Blair.

engaging-with-research

On the 9th of November 2016, The Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Megan Blair, the CEO of Blue Door, a non-profit organisation that aims to better prepare young children for the learning journey through a high quality and low-cost preschool model, hosted an ‘Engaging with Research’ workshop at the offices of The South African Education and Environmental Project (SAEP).

The session, which we hope to be the first of many, was aimed at equipping organisations and individuals working in the early education space with the tools with which to develop evidence-based programmes.

The day began by talking through the value of research to education organisations and it was clear that everyone around the table agreed that it isn’t just a tool for appeasing funders, but rather an important vehicle through which to improve and promote our work. This however is something that is easier said than done and we noted just how difficult it is to keep up work on-the-ground while keeping tabs on developments up in the proverbial academic ivory tower.

In sharing tips for better engagement with research, Megan covered both what to look for in a set of findings and how to stay on top of the latest results coming out in your education field:

Rules of thumb / red flags to keep in mind when digesting research findings:

  • Sample size as a useful quick-reference point for the reliability of a study’s findings (including an analysis of statistical power, and the likelihood of coming to the incorrect conclusion),
  • Being aware of spurious correlation (including examples where causation had been inferred from correlation and why that was problematic), and
  • External validity – which is an appreciation for the context in which the study was conducted and how it differs from the context you work in, before generalising the results.

Resources for staying on top of the latest evidence in your field

Some tools that Megan finds useful (and these are only a few of the many out there), are: Google Scholar alerts for relevant topic areas and researchers; the US Institute of Education Sciences’ “What Works Clearing House” which provides practice guides summarizing the available rigorous in-classroom research on different topics; other resources include Twitter (‘Academic Twitter’) which allows you to follow researchers, who often post interesting links  and whose work relates to your field.

We would like to thank all who attended, and participated in a fruitful and motivating day. We look forward to continued engagement with education practitioners to support innovations for impact.

 

Workshop facilitator: Megan Blair has spent time on both the practitioner and researcher sides of the education space. A former teacher and research analyst, she was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Michigan where she obtained her Masters in Education Policy. She is the co-founder of an early education organisation which aims to better prepare young children for primary school and life through a high quality, low-cost preschool model informed by rigorous research on, among other things, supporting mother-tongue emergent literacy instruction.

bluedoor_logo_landscape2

Posted in Education Innovation, workshops | Leave a comment